Admission requirements

The minimum qualifications (for example, completion of the VCE) required for you to be considered for a particular university course. Entry to many courses is competitive. The attainment of minimum qualifications does not guarantee you will be offered a place.

Associate degree

An Associate degree is a two year qualification that can be undertaken after year 12 or following a Certificate III or IV. Students who complete an associate degree and attain the necessary entry requirements will have the opportunity to enter into a related bachelor degree, with credit exemptions for studies completed. See also Degree, Associate Diploma, and Diploma.

ATAR

An ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admission Rank) is the overall percentile ranking for students in their final year of secondary school in Australia, that reflects the individual’s performance in comparison to other students in the same year.

Bachelor degree

A degree is the award a student gains when they have completed studies in an undergraduate course, which is usually completed in three or four years of full-time study. See also - Degree, Double Degree.

Bridging courses

Some institutions offer bridging or introductory courses to enable you to achieve the required level of assumed knowledge and skills. Adding one or more of these subjects in the first-year of your time at university, however, could prevent you from completing your course in the minimum time (usually 3 years for a Bachelors degree).

Campus

The location(s) where the institution provides the teaching, learning and associated activities for the courses it offers. University campuses are like small towns or communities, providing accommodation, shops and sporting facilities for students. Most also offer a diverse range of student clubs, societies and social activities. Many universities have multiple campuses in metro and regional locations and even overseas.

Commonwealth-supported place (CSP)

A place in a course to which the Australian Government contributes towards the cost. Formerly called HECS places. Read more at the Australian Government site.

Course Selection Officer

Some courses, eg art and design and medicine, may have alternative or additional selection mechanisms such as interviews, folios or an admission test. Selection Officers look at applicants' performance/information and other application requirements for individual courses (where appropriate). This may include supplementary information forms, folios, interviews, auditions and special admissions tests.

Degree

A degree is the award a student gains when they have completed studies in an undergraduate course, which is usually completed in three or four years of full-time study.  See also Associate degree, Associate diploma, and Diploma.

Doctoral student

A student working towards a PhD (a type of post-graduate qualification) usually done by research.

Domestic fee-paying students

Students who are Australian or New Zealand citizens or permanent residents of Australia who meet the entire cost of their studies through tuition fees.

Double degree

Some universities offer degree courses which may be combined with a second degree course, such as Science/Law or Business/Marketing - these are called Double Degrees and they are usually completed in a shorter time, and at less cost, than studying for two consecutive single degrees.

Enrolment

After you have been offered and have accepted a place in a course you will then be asked to enrol at a certain time. Each institution has its own enrolment procedures and in many institutions special advice is available about courses and enrolment plans. Successful applicants will receive enrolment details with their offer of a placement.

Equity Scholarships (ES)

These help financially disadvantaged students with the costs of higher education.

Faculty

A term used to describe a division of a university involved in teaching and research in a group of generally related disciplines. Most faculties are made up of a group of “Schools”, within which there may be a number of “Departments”. E.g. a 'Faculty of Science' may include the 'School of Biological Science' which has under it the 'Department of Zoology'.

Fee-paying course

A course which requires Higher Education students to pay the full cost of the course upfront (these fees are usually paid at the commencement of each enrolment period).

Fees

Students pay a range of course fees (fees are usually paid at the commencement of each enrolement period). The amount varies from course to course and also depends on whether you are a local or international student, an undergraduate or graduate student, or enrolled as a fee-paying or a Commonwealth-supported (see CSP) student.

FEE?HELP

FEE?HELP is a loan scheme that assists eligible fee paying students pay all or part of their tuition fees. It cannot be used for additional study costs such as accommodation or text books. The total amount of FEE?HELP a person can use is known as the ‘FEE?HELP limit’. Once a person begins using FEE?HELP, the amount of FEE?HELP they have left to use is known as their ‘FEE?HELP balance’.

Eligibility
Available for those studying at an approved FEE?HELP provider (approved provider) or through Open Universities Australia (OUA). Loans (subject to limits) are available to Australian citizens; certain New Zealand Special Category Visa holders; other permanent visa holders undertaking bridging study for overseas trained professionals; and  the holders of Australian permanent humanitarian visas; to enable them to pay their student contributions or tuition fees, or for one or two study periods overseas. Loans are repaid later through the taxation system once income has reached a certain level.

For full details and future years' fee help limits, visit the Study Assist Australian Government site. (http://studyassist.gov.au/sites/studyassist/helppayingmyfees/fee-help/pages/fee-help-#HowMuchCanIBorrow) 

Graduate

A person who has received a Degree/Diploma.

Graduate certificate

A postgraduate course, usually of one semester duration, which can be studied as a self-contained course leading to a Graduate Certificate level qualification, or which leads on to a second semester of study, leading to a Graduate Diploma level qualification.

Graduate diploma

A postgraduate course, usually of two semesters duration, which can be studied as a self-contained course leading to a Graduate Diploma level qualification.

Higher Education

Post-Australian Year 12 or equivalent studies, leading to awards including bachelor degree, graduate certificate, graduate diploma, masters degree and doctorate.

Lecture

A face-to-face class where a lecturer (academic) presents course material to all of the students enrolled in a unit of study. Lectures are generally in a lecture theatre, but may also be available via a video link to regional campuses or online through 'Cloud' learning.

Masters courses

These are post-graduate courses usually available only to people who have qualified for an appropriate first Degree/Postgraduate Diploma. They are not available to school leavers.

Masters student

A person who has a degree from a university and is studying for a more advanced qualification. Masters students are required to have previous study or experience in the same discipline area, so that the postgraduate course builds on that earlier study and knowledge. Some courses require completion of a fourth or Honours year of study after completion of the Bachelors degree, as a prerequisite for entry to Masters study.

Orientation

Orientation programs welcome and orient new students to university life. They generally occur just prior to the start of each semester or trimester. During orientation you get to explore your campus, find out about the subjects of your course, meet teaching staff, fellow students and generally have fun. You shouldn’t miss orientation – it’s a great chance to meet new people, find “study buddies”, get the hang of things on your campus and find out what’s expected of you in your course.

Pathway

A general term to describe the path between one course of study and another. Pathways can enable students to pursue a sequence of courses to reach their ultimate study goals. One course may have many pathways to reach it, for example directly from school with an ATAR or through the completion of TAFE subjects or by transferring from a different higher education course.

Postgraduate courses

These are courses usually available only to people who have qualified for an appropriate first Degree/Diploma. They are not available to school leavers.

Postgraduate student

A person who has a degree from a university and is studying for a more advanced qualification, e.g. an award at graduate certificate, graduate diploma, master or doctoral level. For postgraduate awards, students are required to have previous study or experience in the same discipline area as the award, so that the postgraduate course builds on that earlier study and knowledge.

Practical session

These may be in a chemistry lab, a computer lab, or other facility. Often called “pracs” or “labs”, these are classes in which experiments or hands-on activities are conducted under supervision.

Prerequisite subject

A set of conditions (for example completion of one or more Year 12 subjects) that must be met by a student before enrolment in a particular university course is offered. An institution may specify course prerequisites, subject prerequisites or no prerequisites.

Procrastination

The student's worst enemy.  From "procrastinate", verb: To delay, stall, put off, defer when faced with something you do not want to do. Avoid it at all costs.

Selection Officer

Some courses, eg art and design and medicine, may have alternative or additional selection mechanisms such as interviews, folios or an admission test. Selection Officers look at applicants' performance/information and other application requirements for individual courses (where appropriate). This may include supplementary information forms, folios, interviews, auditions and special admissions tests.

Semester

The academic year is usually divided into first and second semesters. Students can start courses at the beginning of the first and, in some cases, second semester. Some institutions call them autumn and spring semesters. Others use session or half-year. Some institutions have trimesters, with an additional study period over summer.

Special Entry Access Schemes (SEAS)

Schemes for university applicants who have experienced long-term educational disadvantage due to circumstances beyond their control or choosing, which may have impacted on their studies. These schemes are designed to make it fairer for all applicants. VTAC has more information on the schemes for Victoria.

Tutorial

A class involving discussion and participation where a small group of students meet with an academic to discuss topics within a unit of study.

Undergraduate course

An undergraduate course is a course leading to a first Higher Education qualification, such as an Associate degree, an Associate diploma, a Diploma, or a first Bachelor degree. Some universities offer degree courses which may be combined with a second degree course, such as Science/Law or Business/Marketing - these are called Double Degrees and they are usually completed in a shorter time, and at less cost, than studying for two consecutive single degrees.

Get in touch

For general or program-wide enquiries, or enquiries about support for LEAP schools to
engage with higher education and participation in LEAP activities please contact us.

General Enquiries: (03) 9903 4632
Program Enquiries: (03) 9903 4627
Email: adm-leap@monash.edu
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