Sciences

It may surprise you to learn that not many scientists work in laboratories. What a scientist actually does and where a scientist works depends on the disciplines or specialisations they have studied.

Many science professionals choose to work in industry, government or research in a specific science discipline, while some work across several related disciplines, or even move into other profession areas such as Health or Engineering.

You probably already know that the sciences can be grouped into four main areas: Biological and Life Sciences; Biomedical and Behavioural Sciences; Earth and Environmental Sciences; and Physical, Chemical, Mathematical & Computational Sciences. Within these areas, at the post-secondary study level there are many disciplines and specialisations that can lead you into many more career paths and roles. 


More about science professionals. What do they do?

Right now, science professionals work in these areas and roles:
Hint: For an alphabetical listing of all science profession roles go to glossary-sciences.

Biological and Life Sciences 

This area of science is concerned with the study of life and living organisms.
Hint: To do more research on careers/ roles, follow the link to their glossary entry.

Choose any, or a combination of the available study disciplines that fit your interests and abilities. Research the employment opportunities in your preferred career areas, and their essential qualifications, before choosing your study disciplines. (See Useful links)

Careers/ roles include:

Study disciplines include:
Agricultural Science; Anatomy; Animal Sciences; Biology; Botany and Plant Sciences; Conservation; Developmental Biology; Ecology; Entomology; Food Science; Genetics; Health / Sports Science; Marine and Freshwater Biology; Zoology.

Biomedical and Behavioural Sciences

This area of science is concerned with the study of cellular and chemical processes in humans, and how these relates to human health.
Hint: To do more research on careers/ roles, follow the link to their glossary entry.

Choose any, or a combination of the available disciplines that fit your interests and abilities. Research the employment opportunities in your preferred career areas, and their essential qualifications, before choosing your study disciplines. (See Useful links).

Careers/ roles include:

Study disciplines include:
Biochemistry; Biotechnology; Cell Biology; Immunology; Microbiology; Molecular Biology; Neuroscience; Pathology; Pharmacology and Physiology; Psychological Science.

Earth and Environmental Sciences

This area of science looks at the environment and the earth’s processes.
Hint: To do more research on careers/ roles, follow the link to their glossary entry.

Choose any, or a combination of the available disciplines that fit your interests and abilities. Research the employment opportunities in your preferred career areas, and their essential qualifications, before choosing your study disciplines. (See Useful links).

Careers/ roles include:

Study disciplines include:
Atmospheric Science; Environmental Science; Geography; Geology; Geomatics; Geophysics; Meteorology.

Physical, Chemical, Mathematical & Computational Sciences

This area of science enquires into the properties of matter and energy, including how atoms and molecules behave, using the tools and scientific principles of the disciplines of Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics and Computational Science.
Hint: To do more research on careers/ roles, follow the link to their glossary entry.

Choose any, or a combination of the available disciplines that fit your interests and abilities. Research the employment opportunities in your preferred career areas, and their essential qualifications, before choosing your study disciplines. (See Useful links).

Careers/ roles include:

Study disciplines include:
Atmospheric Science; Chemical Sciences; Computational Sciences; Geomatics; Geophysics; Mathematical Sciences; Meteorology; Physics.

 

General Science

General Science is a great way to get a feel for the different science disciplines in the workplace. If you just love doing science and can't decide what to focus on, General Science may be for you! There are many different roles open to General Science graduates. Here are a few...
Hint: To do more research on careers/ roles, follow the link to their glossary entry.

Choose any, or a combination of the available disciplines that fit your interests and abilities. Research the employment opportunities in your preferred career areas, and their essential qualifications, before choosing your study disciplines. (See Useful links).

Careers/ roles include:

Study disciplines include:
Any, or a combination of the available science disciplines that fit your interests.

Science professionals and students tell their own stories

View videos and read first-hand accounts from university science graduates about their experiences in their chosen field at Professional profiles...

View videos and read profiles of students telling their own stories about overcoming barriers to study at uni. Hear what motivated them to choose their area of study and what they are experiencing at uni at Student stories...

How much can I earn?

The lifetime earnings/ wage gap, between people who graduate from university and those who don't, is significant. Different research measures estimate the higher lifetime earnings by graduates at anywhere from 30% to 75% greater than school leavers1.

Average weekly earnings before tax (2015 data) for science professions range from $1,481 (Agricultural/ Forestry Scientist) to $2,341 (Geologist/ Geophysicist)2.  Check out the Science professions snapshot infographic below, for earnings data in other areas of Science.

Whatever science discipline they study, science graduates (Bachelor, newly qualified, under 25) can start on annual incomes between $50k and $60k (median salary is 55k). Starting salaries in these sciences disciplines are: Agricultural $50k; Biological $50k; Computer $54k; Earth $60k; Physical $50k. Mathematics graduates can start on earnings of up to $60k a year3.

Footnotes:
1. ABC News Fact Check - see http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-29/pyne- graduate-earnings-and-unemployment-claim-overblown/5446462
2. ABS Characteristics of Employment Survey.
3. Graduate careers Australia - www.graduatecareers.com.au - Graduate Salaries Report 2015.


Useful links

LEAP Partner Universities -  from here, you can follow links to our partner universities' LEAP landing pages, for direct access to info about each university, their courses, scholarships, student support services, pathways options and other useful information.

Students - Beyond School has lots relevant information about the world of work, work experience, career planning, pathways and development, and occupations for secondary school students. (Victorian Government site)

Study Assist helps school students and their families understand what support they are eligible for if pursuing higher education, based on a range of study options available to them. (Australian Government site)

My Future has a guide to career development, to education beyond Year 12, videos by professionals and interactive career quizzes. My Future also has a new myfuture forum, a tool allowing you to talk to people working in a range of industries. (Australian Government site)

Bullseye posters - School subjects you like and jobs they can lead to. (Australian Government site)

Job Outlook is a careers and labour market research information site to help individuals decide on their future career. (Australian Government site)

My Skills - Online information about vocational education and training options. (Australian Government site)

Good Universities Guide - Online careers guide.

Start building your skills now

If you think a career in science is for you, why not start planning how to get there? Go to Building skills to see what you can do right now. Then remember to review your Career Action Plan with your teacher or careers teacher.

Get in touch

To enquire about LEAP activities for your school
please contact one of LEAP's participating Universities

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